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Ryan Brindle, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar

PhD, Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine, University of Birmingham

Mentor: Martica Hall, PhD

BrindleRC@upmc.edu


Ryan started as a postdoctoral scholar with the T32 Translational Research Training in Sleep Medicine program. He received his PhD in Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine from the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom, where his research focused on cardiovascular and autonomic nervous system responses to episodes of acute mental and physical stress. Ryan's current interests include applying his training in psychophysiology and stress and stress to sleep medicine in an effort to better understand the interactions between sleep and stress and how these factors contrbute to the development and progression of cardiovascular disease and has now received independent funding through the NIH to further explore this research.

Trainees

Ashlee Brooke McKeon, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar

PhD, Rehabilitation Science, University of Pittsburgh (2016)

Mentors: Anne Germain, PhD

mckeonab2@upmc.edu


Ashlee is a postdoctoral scholar with the T32 Translational Research Training in Sleep Medicine program. She received her doctorate in Rehabilitation Science at the University of Pittsburgh (2016) where her dissertation was on the isolation of physiological states as predictive factors of behavioral dysregulation in adults with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Prior to her dissertation research, much of Ashlee's work was on both human and mouse models examining sleep/wake behavior, mental health, and brain activity after trauma. In particular, she focused on the role of sleep on the onset and pervasiveness of daytime Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptomology in combat-exposed military veterans.  Ashlee is now merging together her experience in mental health, sleep, and clinical rehabilitation through a novel military-focused research track exploring sleep and PTSD as mediating factors in the relationship between combat-related TBI and cognitive functioning, and the long-term impact on rehabilitation outcomes.

Graduate Students

Laura B. Samuelsson

Graduate Student

MS, Clinical Psychology and Biological/Health Psychology, University of Pittsburgh (2013)

Mentor: Martica H. Hall, PhD

samuelssonlb@upmc.edu


Laura is pursuing a doctorate degree in the dual Clinical and Biological/Health Psychology program at the University of Pittsburgh. For her Master's thesis and subsequent work, she has developed novel scoring paradigms for objectively-assessed snoring and has investigated the relationships between objective snoring and indices of cardiometabolic health. Laura has a parallel research focus on the role of sleep disruption in mammary oncogenesis.

Briana J. Taylor

PhD, Health Psychology, University of Pittsburgh (2017)

Mentor: Martica H. Hall, PhD

milliganbj@upmc.edu


Briana recently defended her dissertation which examined cross-sectional and prospective relationships between indices of sleep timing and metabolic health and received her doctorate degree.  Briana's research interests focus on biological and behavioral rhythms with respect to cardiometabolic health and aging.

Marissa Bowman

Pre-doctoral Trainee

BA, University of Notre Dame (2016)

Mentor: Martica H. Hall, PhD

Clinical/Biological-Health Psychology Doctoral Student

Mabowman5@pitt.edu


Marissa is a first-year graduate student pursuing a doctoral degree in the dual Clinical and Biological/Health Psychology program at the University of Pittsburgh. She is interested in the bidirectional pathways between sleep and physical/mental health. More specifically, she studies sleep characteristics and rhythms in relation to cardiometabolic measures and emotion regulation, and is especially interested in these processes in individuals with insomnia, depression, or anxiety.





               

T32 Summer Medical Students

Cristine Oh

T32 Summer Research Medical Student (MS-2)

BA, Psychology, Literature, Yale University (2006)

Mentor: Anne Germain, PhD

Project: The Effects of Gender and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) on Objective and Subjective Experiences of Sleep

               

T32 Training Alumni

Mikisa Solomon

T32 Summer Research Medical Student (MS-2)

BS, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University (2016)

Mentor: Martica Hall, PhD; Ryan Brindle, PhD

Project: The Interrelationship of Sleep, Socioeconomic Status and Mental Health Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease Risk

Sarah Hogan

T32 Summer Research Medical Student (MS-2)

BS, Natural Sciences, University of Pittsburgh (2015)C

Mentor: Kristine Wilckens, PhD

Project: Temporal Spectral Sleep Relationships and Executive Function in Older Adults  



Lynn Baniak, RN, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar

PhD, Nursing, Binghamton University (2015)

Mentors: Eileen R. Chasens, PhD; Patrick J. Strollo, MD

baniakl@pitt.edu


Lynn is a postdoctoral scholar with the T32 Translational Research Training in Sleep Medicine program.  Her research focuses on the impact of impaired sleep on patient centered outcomes in older adults. She received her doctorate in nursing at Binghamton University (2015) where her dissertation integrated nursing science and engineering techniques. The study examined the role of calf muscle pump stimulation in the hemodynamics of breathing during sleep and its potential effect on sleep quality and functional status in persons with suspected obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Before joining the Sleep Medicine program, she was a postdoctoral scholar in the School of Nursing, T32 Technology: Research in Chronic and Critical Illness. Her current study, funded by the American Nurses Foundation, aims to characterize sleep in older veterans with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction to better understand the effect of impaired sleep, specifically from OSA, on health-related quality of life. She is now beginning to explore the role of treatment of OSA with CPAP as a potential therapeutic target for frailty management in an older veteran population.

Rachel P. Ogilvie, PhD, MPH

Postdoctoral Scholar

PhD, Epidemiology, University of Minnesota (2017)

Mentors: Sanjay Patel, MD, MS

ogilvierp@upmc.edu


Rachel is a postdoctoral scholar with the T32 Translational Research Training in Sleep Medicine program. She received her doctorate in Epidemiology at the University of Minnesota and her MPH in Behavioral Sciences from Emory University. Rachel's research focuses on the epidemiology of sleep and cardiometabolic disease, including the association between sleep duration and obesity as well as the association between sleep apnea and cardiovascular events. She is also interested in the measurement of sleep and how errors in measurement affect associations.

Rachel Kolko, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar

PhD, Clinical Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis (2015)

Mentors: Daniel J. Buysse, MD, Michele Levine, PhD

kolkorp2@upmc.edu


Rachel is a postdoctoral scholar with the T32 Translational Research Training in Sleep Medicine program. She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology at Washington University in St. Louis (2015) and completed her predoctoral internship through the Clinical Psychology Internship Program at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic and the Department of Psychiatry in the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Her work in graduate school focused on designing and implementing evidence-based interventions for obesity and eating disorders among children, adults, and families, and on evaluating practitioner training approaches to increase access to effective care. Rachel's current work builds on her experience with intervention trials by examining behavioral and biological factors, including the role of sleep, circadian rhythms, and the gut microbiome, in relation to risk and resilience in the context of obesity and eating disorders.


Jessica Hamilton, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar

PhD, Psychology, Temple University (2017)

Mentors: Peter Franzen, PhD

hamiltonjl2@upmc.edu


Jessica is a postdoctoral scholar with the T32 Translational Research Training in Sleep Medicine program. Jessica is a postdoctoral scholar with the T32 Translational Research Training in Sleep Medicine program. She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Temple University and completed her clinical internship at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. Jessica's research focuses on the interplay between interpersonal, biological, and psychological processes in the development of depression among adolescents, with an emphasis on understanding gender differences. Jessica is building upon her prior work by examining how sleep and stress influence typical and atypical adolescent development in risk for depression and suicide.